Marrinup

More than a campsite

Marrinup townsite is a heritage listed site located just a short drive north of Dwellingup. Once a thriving mill town, the townsite was abandoned during the downturn of the timber industry and ultimately destroyed by the 1961 bushfires.  Today the townsite is a designated camping area in the heart of the Marrinup State Forest, but its history is what makes Marrinup more than just another campsite.
 

flow of the falls

Following winter rains, the Marrinup Falls are one of the most picturesque reasons to visit.  A looped walking trail takes visitors on a bush track, which blooms with wildflowers in the Spring, to the top of the falls which gently flow down the valley.  Take a picnic and savour the peace and quiet.

A HERITAGE GHOST TOWN

In 1902 a horse-drawn tramway was constructed from Pinjarra to serve a sawmill at Marrinup.  At the time, Marrinup was a town of greater significance then Dwellingup or Pinjarra and the mill operated until the 1930's.  The townsite included a school and housing, the ruins of which are now heritage listed.
 
 

WAR COMES TO MARRINUP

In an agreement with Britain, a POW camp was established at Marrinup during World War II.  The Marrinup camp was able to house up to 1,200 prisoners and commenced operations in August 1943. German and Italian prisoners were kept in different parts of the compound and ceased operations in August 1946. Today visitors can tour the site ruins and interpretive display.
 

Flow Of The Falls

Following winter rains, the Marrinup Falls are one of the most picturesque reasons to visit.  A looped walking trail takes visitors on a bush track, which blooms with wildflowers in the Spring, to the top of the falls which gently flow down the valley.  Take a picnic and savour the peace and quiet.
 

A Heritage Ghost Town

In 1902 a horse-drawn tramway was constructed from Pinjarra to serve a sawmill at Marrinup.  At the time, Marrinup was a town of greater significance then Dwellingup or Pinjarra and the mill operated until the 1930's.  The townsite included a school and housing, the ruins of which are now heritage listed.
 

War comes to Marrinup

In an agreement with Britain, a POW camp was established at Marrinup during World War II.  The Marrinup camp was able to house up to 1,200 prisoners and commenced operations in August 1943. German and Italian prisoners were kept in different parts of the compound and ceased operations in August 1946. Today visitors can tour the site ruins and interpretive display.
Camping

Bush camping at its best.

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Walk Trails

Easy walking trails for the whole family to enjoy.

Wander The Trails

Bike Trails

An easy, single track trail through the bush.

Ride The Trail

POW Camp

Discover a slice of WWII heritage in the forest.

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Let's plan your visit

There's nothing like the advice of a trusted local to help you make the most of your well earned break;especially in a wilderness area.  Our team at the Dwellingup Trails and Visitor Centre can point you in the right direction to ensure that your visit is safe and great fun.

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Where To Camp

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Trail Conditions

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Directions

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What to see

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Equipment Hire

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Staying Safe

OLD MARRINUP TOWNSITE

The first sawmill at Marrinup was  established in the 1880s by Charles Tuckey. In 1898, a steam-driven, 14-horse-power sawmill was opened by Hannans Milling Co., as well as a wooden railway transporting logs. The first rail was built from Pinjarra to  Marrinup in 1902, transporting people and goods in, and timber out. Today,  the line is still used by the Hotham Valley Tourist Railway. Marrinup gradually declined in size during the 1920s, while Dwellingup became the region’s major timber town. Marrinup was destroyed in the Dwellingup
1961 bushfires and the old townsite is not the Marrinup Campground.

 

Adventures In Nature 

Marrinup is one of those hidden gems that you find off the beaten track.  Bushcamping and nature-based adventures await.  Check out our stories to inspire your next escape.

Dining In Dwellingup Baked With Love In Dwellingup's Cafes How About Them Apples? Where Trails Meet All Aboard The Time Machine ‘Oar’some Days On The River The NEW Murray Valley Bike Trails